I remember Rabaa

An Egyptian riot policeman points his gun towards at stone-throwers during clashes that broke out as Egyptian security forces moved in to disperse supporters of Egypt's ousted president Mohamed Morsi by force in a huge protest camp near Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque in eastern Cairo on August 14, 2013. MOHAMMED ABDEL MONEIM/AFP/Getty Images)

An Egyptian riot policeman points his gun towards at stone-throwers during clashes that broke out as Egyptian security forces moved in to disperse supporters of Egypt’s ousted president Mohamed Morsi by force in a huge protest camp near Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque in eastern Cairo on August 14, 2013. MOHAMMED ABDEL MONEIM/AFP/Getty Images)

I remember 14 August, 2013, more than I remember most days of my life. I was planning on wearing my new black shirt to work that day; the one with a semi-transparent back.

I remember drowsily getting out of bed, considering which stories I would cover for the paper that day, before being updated by my mum about the latest news.

“They’re dispersing the sit-ins,” she said, shaking, while anchored in front of the television airing live footage of the dispersals.

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The rise of the Sisists

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One protester holds a poster of Gamal Abdel Nasser side by side with a poster of Abdel Fatah Al-Sisi in a demonstration in Tahrir square delegating the armed forces and the police to fight violence and terrorism on 26 July 2013
Rana Muhammad Taha

It starts with a military general whose membership in the Supreme Council of Armed Forces (SCAF) constitutes one of the most brutal military regimes Egypt has ever witnessed. The same military general who finds no fault in admitting that the armed forces indeed subjected female protesters – arrested on 9 March (2011) after a peaceful sit-in in Tahrir Sqaure was violently dispersed – to virginity tests to “protect the girls from rape as well as to protect the soldiers and officers from rape accusations”.

Only two years after this controversial confession, the same man, general Abdel Fatah Al Sisi becomes the most popular man in Egypt, proving to be a direct threat to army strongman Gamal Abdel Nasser’s throne. Continue reading

Calm restored to Egypt after dispersing pro-Morsi sit-ins;

Supporters of Egypt’s deposed president Mohamed Morsi walk past his portrait in Cairo on July 23, 2013 during a sit in outside Rabaa al-Adaweya mosque. (AFP Photo)

Supporters of Egypt’s deposed president Mohamed Morsi walk past his portrait in Cairo on July 23, 2013 during a sit in outside Rabaa al-Adaweya mosque.
(AFP Photo)

A cloud of rest and calm overshadowed Egyptian streets Friday night after two mega sit-ins set up in support of ousted President Mohamed Morsi were dispersed in a joint effort between the armed forces and the Ministry of Interior.

Pro-Morsi protesters who had been sitting-in around Rabaa Al-Adaweya mosque in Cairo and Al-Nahda Square in Giza were finally reunited with family and friends after over a month of sleeping out in the streets. Continue reading