Reward for providing journalists with ‘No’ voter on Egypt’s constitutional referendum

A female 'Yes' voter wrapped in Egypt's flag as she waits her turn outside the polling station

A female ‘Yes’ voter wrapped in Egypt’s flag as she waits her turn outside the polling station

The media outlets union announced on Wednesday a $100,000 reward for whoever puts the union through to a ‘No’ voter on Egypt’s constitutional referendum.

The reward comes after journalists from different news services failed to find a single citizen who voted ‘No’ on the draft constitution. Continue reading

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Amid the violence and the curfew; Surviving Egypt

"I've watched all the new, AND old, movies, several times" ... "And I think I don't need to count the floor's tiles for the 69th time"

“I’ve watched all the new, AND old, movies, several times” … “And I think I don’t need to count the floor’s tiles for the 69th time”

The number-one question that bombarded me from every foreigner who contacted me since the violence which followed the dispersal of the pro-Mohamed Morsi sit-ins was always:

“What’s happening on the streets of Egypt now?” or “How is it like living in Egypt now?” or “How is it like to be on Egypt’s streets now?”

Some even have gone as far as ask me; “How is your family taking all that’s happening in Egypt now?”

Obviously, other than the death toll, the assailants and the calls for reconciliation, everybody, outside Egypt, is mostly curious about Egyptian’s day-to-day activities in light of what’s happening.

And I don’t blame them. Continue reading

The rise of the Sisists

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One protester holds a poster of Gamal Abdel Nasser side by side with a poster of Abdel Fatah Al-Sisi in a demonstration in Tahrir square delegating the armed forces and the police to fight violence and terrorism on 26 July 2013
Rana Muhammad Taha

It starts with a military general whose membership in the Supreme Council of Armed Forces (SCAF) constitutes one of the most brutal military regimes Egypt has ever witnessed. The same military general who finds no fault in admitting that the armed forces indeed subjected female protesters – arrested on 9 March (2011) after a peaceful sit-in in Tahrir Sqaure was violently dispersed – to virginity tests to “protect the girls from rape as well as to protect the soldiers and officers from rape accusations”.

Only two years after this controversial confession, the same man, general Abdel Fatah Al Sisi becomes the most popular man in Egypt, proving to be a direct threat to army strongman Gamal Abdel Nasser’s throne. Continue reading