I remember Rabaa

An Egyptian riot policeman points his gun towards at stone-throwers during clashes that broke out as Egyptian security forces moved in to disperse supporters of Egypt's ousted president Mohamed Morsi by force in a huge protest camp near Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque in eastern Cairo on August 14, 2013. MOHAMMED ABDEL MONEIM/AFP/Getty Images)

An Egyptian riot policeman points his gun towards at stone-throwers during clashes that broke out as Egyptian security forces moved in to disperse supporters of Egypt’s ousted president Mohamed Morsi by force in a huge protest camp near Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque in eastern Cairo on August 14, 2013. MOHAMMED ABDEL MONEIM/AFP/Getty Images)

I remember 14 August, 2013, more than I remember most days of my life. I was planning on wearing my new black shirt to work that day; the one with a semi-transparent back.

I remember drowsily getting out of bed, considering which stories I would cover for the paper that day, before being updated by my mum about the latest news.

“They’re dispersing the sit-ins,” she said, shaking, while anchored in front of the television airing live footage of the dispersals.

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Bring back Sadat! (the metro station, not the president)

Interim President Adly Mansour rides a train taking its first trip through the new metro line

Interim President Adly Mansour rides a train taking its first trip through the new metro line

The amount of time it took me to get sardined into the ladies’ cart made it obvious; this would be a special ride. But … it was just way more special than I had calculated. Continue reading

Coming this winter; the latest in the nationalism fashion line

egyptian-women-casting-her-voteEgypt’s patriotic nationalists announced the latest campaign in the fashion line; “vote yes on the constitution to prove you don’t want to see Egypt crumble”.

Patriotic nationalist psychiatrist/political analyst Manal Omar launched the campaign during her weekly appearance at the show of patriotic anchor Mahmoud Saad.

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Egypt cancels Friday

Photo of the new, minus-Friday calendar, in effect starting October

Photo of the new, minus-Friday calendar, in effect starting October

Prime Minister Hazem Al-Beblawi issued a decision to take all Fridays off the Calendar until further notice, following a cabinet meeting on Friday, possibly the last Friday Egypt will see in a long time. Continue reading

State of emergency extension promises booming economy: experts

Interim President Adly Mansour issued a presidential decree extending the state of emergency

Interim President Adly Mansour issued a presidential decree extending the state of emergency

Extending the state of emergency and going forward with other exceptional security measures is bound to have a positive effect on Egypt’s failing economy, experts confirmed. Continue reading

How to be a positive nationalist?

A poll conducted by the Baseera reseach centre put the percentage of Egyptians ready to tolerate other Egyptian’s lack of nationalism at 19 percent. Another poll, also conducted by Baseera, suggested that at least 78 percent of Egypt’s population will only vote for the candidate who adopts a nationalist ideology. In an attempt to help the remaining minority of non-nationalist Egyptians, and foreigners, to better blend within Egypt’s national fabric, we have combined a list of guidelines to help you pursue a better, more focused nationalist future. Continue reading

Amid the violence and the curfew; Surviving Egypt

"I've watched all the new, AND old, movies, several times" ... "And I think I don't need to count the floor's tiles for the 69th time"

“I’ve watched all the new, AND old, movies, several times” … “And I think I don’t need to count the floor’s tiles for the 69th time”

The number-one question that bombarded me from every foreigner who contacted me since the violence which followed the dispersal of the pro-Mohamed Morsi sit-ins was always:

“What’s happening on the streets of Egypt now?” or “How is it like living in Egypt now?” or “How is it like to be on Egypt’s streets now?”

Some even have gone as far as ask me; “How is your family taking all that’s happening in Egypt now?”

Obviously, other than the death toll, the assailants and the calls for reconciliation, everybody, outside Egypt, is mostly curious about Egyptian’s day-to-day activities in light of what’s happening.

And I don’t blame them. Continue reading